Louise Campbell – Danish Furniture Designer

Posted on 20th September 2011 in Danish Furniture Designers

Louise Campbell is a contemporary, modern furniture designer who is described as providing a fresh and innovative way of looking at the everyday as well as finding new ways to construct it. Born to a Danish father and an English mother in Copenhagen in 1970, she graduated from the London College of Furniture in 1992. Continuing her studies at Denmark’s Design School in 1995, she opened her own studio in 1996.
Her interest in modern design covers the range of furniture, lighting, table ware, product and interior design. She is actively engaged in designing and setting up exhibitions of contemporary crafts as well as a collaborative effort between her and others in the design industry called “Walk the Plank”. Walk the Plank was started in the late 1990’s as a method for furniture designers and cabinet makers to encourage and support creativity and uphold high standards of craftsmanship among Danish designers. This has held to the design of some rather unique pieces of furniture as the initial starting point is a solid plank of wood. Modern furniture design challenged to provide both form and function organically and utilitarian.
With her modern furniture being produced by Louis Poulsen Lighting, HAY, MUUTO and Zanotta her work has become well known winning several awards. In 2004, she won the Finn Juhl Prize, in 2005 gold for Campbell Pendlen and in 2007, the Bruno Mathsson Award.
With her playful and imaginative sense of bending the possibility of reality, the “Bless You” chair designed in 1999 of felt and gelatin it was inspired by a used pocket handkerchief. “Leave Your Mark’ in 2002 was designed as an attempt to relieve tension in waiting rooms. With four sharp knives attached to the table top, it encourages personalizing the table top in same manner.
The Folda- series , 2001, which includes a sofa and a chair, is unique in its flexibility to accommodate four different positions, from 120 degrees to flat and the method of construction. Unlike traditional manufacturing where the upholstery is sewn last, here it is sewn first and then it is filled with the plywood and foam and zipped together.
A modern furniture piece that she originally designed for the Hay in 2001, she produced by combining water cut neoprene rubber with laser cut steel. A surprising contrasts of visual transparency and materials, it was inspired by Prince Frederik who was at once traditional nobility and yet in tune with his generation. She is noted for producing modern furniture pieces with this particular recurring theme.

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Verner Panton – Danish Furniture Designers

Posted on 12th September 2011 in Danish Furniture Designers

Verner Panton – Considered one of Denmark’s most influential furniture and interior designers of the 20th century, Verner Panton (1926-1998) was a fearless pioneer in designing with a variety of materials, including plastics in bold colors. Though his style most often invokes the 1960s, his designs continue to be popular today. Panton’s classic furniture models were, as of 2004, still in at the house of Vitra and others.

He studied architecture at the Royal Danish Academy of Art, and graduated in 1951, becoming a uniquely gifted and talented artist. His work would reflect his skill in his designs in seating, lighting, wall elements, the environment and fabric through the late 1970s. His early career was began working at the firm of another Danish architect and designer, Arne Jacobsen. Panton, not known to work well with others, opened his own design and architectural office. This era of his work included a collapsible house (1955) and the Cardboard House and the Plastic House (1960.)

His seating designs towards the end of the 1950s became more unconventional – chairs were made with no legs and without a visible back. In 1960, Panton introduced the Stacking chair or S chair – the very first single-form injection-molded plastic chair. It has become his most famous and mass-produced piece. The chair realized one of Panton’s fundamental objectives: a plastic chair as an affordable industrial product. A cantilever base offers seating comfort and its shape conforms to the body. The piece is can be used indoors or outdoors.

Among some of his other highly acclaimed achievements: he was the first to create inflatable furniture; the interior design of a German boat, now a famous museum; the cone chair (1958); a European hotel that designed with cylindrical furniture and circular patterns and his design work conducted for Der Spiegel, a German publication.

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Nanna Ditzel – Danish Furniture Designer

Posted on 26th August 2011 in Danish Furniture Designers

Nanna Ditzel – The Danish School of Arts and Crafts has consistently trained and produced talented furniture designers. Nanna Ditzel studied both at this school and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen graduating in 1946 and proceeded to open her own studio with Jørgen Ditzel.

Born in 1923 and living until 2005, she explored a variety of artistic mediums; these included textiles, tableware and cabinet making.  Furniture was designed for Frederica, Kvist, Getama and others who carried her lines as well as Georg Jensen who carried her jewellery designs and Kvadrat, her textiles. Open to investigating and utilizing new materials and construction techniques, she explored using fiberglass, foam rubber and wicker.

As a recipient of the Lunning Prize in 1956, which was awarded on a yearly basis from 1951 until 1970 to two Scandinavian designers who best exemplified Scandinavian design, in 1990 she won the Gold medal in the International Furniture Design Competition in Japan for “Fredericia”, “Bench for Two”.  She was also awarded the lifelong Artist’s Grant by the Danish Ministry of Culture in 1998.

As the world of architecture changed during this time so did interior design. Split level interior plans became popular during the 1950’s. She experimented with designing modern furniture seating that would be best suited for this new idea of space. One of these productions was the “Hanging Chair” produced in 1957 that appeared quite simply as a half egg made of wicker material. She established Interspace with Kurt Heide in London from 1968 – 1986 operating as an international furniture store. She then returned to Copenhagen.

Known as a prolific designer, she had several one woman exhibitions around the world over the course of her design career. With literary aspirations as well, she wrote the book Danish Chairs in 1954. The award winning “Bench for Two” produced in 1989 was made of solid maple and aeroplane ply with silkscreen printing. With a hypnotic circular repetitive pattern, the two halves fit together to form the backrest with another half circle forming the seat. Resting above four modern minimalist legs, it appears to float and invite at the same time.  In 1990 she designed the “Butterfly Chair”. This was an exploration of modern furniture new materials made from folded fiberboard with silkscreen printing on a simple, animated metal frame.  Her exuberance in modern design furniture is well typified in “Joy” Dressing table produced in 1999 as part of the “Joy” bedroom collection that utilized curvilinear forms with the best in modern form and function.

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Niels Joergen Haugesen – Danish Furniture Designer

Posted on 25th August 2011 in Danish Furniture Designers


Niels Joergen Haugesen
– Born in 1936 in Vivild, Denmark, he was trained as a cabinet maker and in 1956 graduated with a degree in furniture design from the College of Arts and Design. Eventually he began to work with the architect Arne Jacobsen in Copenhagen in 1966 until 1971. This time would serve to influence his future designs.

Working as a teacher at Denmark’s Design School, he opened his own design studio in 1971. From 1980 to 1995 he collaborated with the architect Gunvor Haugesen.

Recognized for his modern furniture designs and attention to detail he was awarded the Danish ID Design Award for the “Haugesen Table” in 1986. The table was designed with two extensions that allowed for the modern furniture piece to be folded into a compact form with a variety of wood tops available including oak, walnut and maple.

He also won the Danish ID Design Award for the X-line chair in 1987 that which was produced in 2000. So named because no matter what angle the chair is viewed the minimalist metal frame is perceived to form an “X” shape.

Another design that he received critical acclaim for is the Nimbus Table System that combines five distinctly separate table tops to create one single table top. With a series of five different permutations of this experimenting with different colors and types of woods it allowed for the design of bigger tables celebrating and  viewing each piece individually while admiring the whole.

With a strict adherence to the modern furniture design that less is more, in the Xylofon collection it entails the crisscrossing of metal and wood,  usually using teak for the seats.

In 1996 he won the Danish Furniture Award and in 1997 he won first prize in the Danish Forest Association’s Furniture Competition ultimately receiving  in 1998, the Lifelong Artist’s Grant by the Danish State Art Fund.

Frederica Furniture has produced his designs since 2002. One of his more recent productions is the “Distance” sofa so named because of the distance that separates the neck support from the back support making it appear to float above it. The collection included a series of available configurations with an armchair and stool as well.

His works can be viewed at the Danish Museum of Applied Art, Museum of Modern Art in New York and the DK-Copenhagen Arts Decoratif Union Louvre in Paris.

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Poul Kjaerholm – Danish Furniture Designer

Posted on 8th August 2011 in Danish Furniture Designers

Poul Kjaerholm was a prolific and inspired designer. Born in 1928 and living until 1980 he was expressive of many designers of his time in his use of materials and modern furniture designs.

The Danish School of Arts and Crafts in Copenhagen produced many talented modern furniture designers. Poul attended the school until 1952 after first apprenticing as a cabinetmaker in 1948 with Gronbech.  Once he graduated he went on to teach until 1956.

As much an educator as a designer, he went on to lecture at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, becoming head of the Institute of Design in 1973.

As a designer he was meticulous in the details of construction of his furniture insisting, consistent with modern design, that functionality and form be seamless. With high quality craftsmanship, he created some contemporary furniture with molded plywood producing the minimalist PKO plywood series. However, he became more intrigued with the use of steel as a material source. Light and its refraction upon its surface captured his interest and he conveyed this through pieces like thePK11 dining chair. He insisted that the lines and spaces that his modern furniture created be framed in an architectural perspective. This particular chair exemplified this with exacting lines and just enough organic materials, leather and wood, to make it inviting.

E. Kold Christensen understood and respected Poul’s artistic expression allowing him a free rein to design as he pleased. Producing most of his designs up until his death in 1980, it was a productive collaboration.

While several museums host some of his works, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London have the largest permanent collections of his works.

In his lifetime he won several awards including twice at the Grand Prix at the Milan Triennale in 1957 and 1960, the Lunning Award in 1958 and the ID Award in 1973. The PK22 was the chair he designed and produced upon graduating from The Danish School of Arts and Crafts and the chair that was responsible for his first award in 1957. It was originally built from hand-woven rattan over steel and his first commercial success. With these same materials he designed the hammock chair in 1965 and the PK31 series that explored cubist proportions, the exact sectioning of space. Looking for an ideal form, he used the dimension 76cm on each side as way to create single modern furniture pieces, a chair and then working to repeat this same cube producing two and three seat sofas.

 

 

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Poul Volther – Danish Furniture Designer

Posted on 4th August 2011 in Danish Furniture Designers, Furniture Designers

 Poul Volther is best known for the “Corona Chair” and matching ottoman designed and produced in 1964. Originally conceived of in 1961, his prototype model was constructed out of solid oak. Experimenting with a variety of materials, the successful model that we are familiar with today was made out of steel and manufactured by Erik Jorgensen.

Many modern furniture designers during this time designed with the comfort and proper support of the human form in mind. Resembling an assemblage of seemingly floating pieces that appear more like that of a backbone with ribs, it was inspired by a solar eclipse. This is how it received its name, which refers to the outer layers of the sun’s atmosphere as viewed through time lapse photography during an eclipse.

Padded for comfort, it is supported on highly polished chrome steel legs that seem to defy its ability to function as designed. Available in high grain Italian leather or a wide range of materials and colors, it received both praise and attention in the contemporary furniture world. This same chair was later used in 2002 in Copenhagen by the European Heads. It however, never originally received the approval of the public and was to resurface again in 1984, again to critical acclaim but still not appealing to the mass market.

In 2002, it was again presented as a silent participant at the EU Top meeting in Copenhagen. This time not only did the contemporary furniture community applaud his design but so did the world. Just as his chair was to finally receive the recognition it deserved, Poul Volther passed away. The “Corona Chair” today surpasses sales of all the other chairs for the manufacturer Erik Jorgensen. While Poul Volter designed many other pieces of modern furniture as well as modern lighting, none ever equaled the attention that this chair received.

Born in 1923 until 200, he was witness to the explosion of creativity and innovation that occurred during this time period in modern and contemporary furniture. Originally trained as a cabinet maker in Denmark at The Danish School of Arts and Crafts and then later he taught at The Danish School of Art and Design. With his dedication to high quality craftsmanship, he produced never before seen modern furniture. Influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement and following the tenets of modern design he focused on both function and form, keeping each in equal balance.

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Verner Panton – Danish Furniture Designer

Posted on 1st August 2011 in Danish Furniture Designers, Furniture Designers

His dog was named “Happy” and so it seems was he. Born in Denmark, his colorful albeit short life, 1926 – 1998, influenced many contemporary furniture designers of his time. With his psychedelic use of colors and his futuristic use of plastics to create other worldly styled modern furniture, he stretched the boundaries of gravity and color. Vibrant and exciting with a 1960’s flavor, he was known as Denmark’s most influential furniture and interior designer of his time.

His design background was started by studying architecture at the Royal Danish Academy of Art in Copenhagen and then working for a short time for Arne Jacobsen. Not able to be restrained he opened his own design and architectural firm. Working with ideas of the physically impossible such as a collapsible house in 1955 and the Cardboard House and the Plastic House in 1960, his ideas were evolving on a concurrent line with his interior and furnishings designs.

Just as his architecture became more innovative so did his furniture designs where he literally began eliminating any evidence of obvious physical structure. In 1960 he produced the first single-form injection molded plastic chair, the Stacking chair or nicknamed, the S chair. With an appearance more like a piece of ribbon rather than a chair, it was made of plywood with two variations for the back, one rounded and one a subtle dip in the middle. With no legs or any obvious source of support, it seems to almost be suspended in space.  He also designed rounded storage cupboards with sliding doors. Made of molded plywood he offered lacquered or veneered surfaces in a variety of sizes.

Perhaps his most innovative was the Flying chair he designed in 1963 and 1964. While the world of modern furniture was busy exploring the concept of seeming weightlessness, he literally suspended this chair from the ceiling on two sides with the ability to be adjusted in height. Plywood molds were used having the look of a half shell and upholstered with a fabric cover.

Not satisfied to experiment with the space age materials during this time, he chose to expand his contemporary furniture into a complete interior environment. Here, spaces explode with textures, curving furniture and walls, eye popping lights and textiles enchanting to both sight and to touch. Commissioned twice to design for the 1970 “Visona 2” exhibit at the Cologne furniture fair, he never failed to excite and ignite the world of modern furniture.

 

 

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Arne Jacobsen – Chair – Danish Furniture Designer

Posted on 28th July 2011 in Danish Furniture, Danish Furniture Designers

danishfurniture.blogspot.comFamous for his broad range of chair designs, Arne Jacobsen considered himself an architect first despite his successes in modern furniture. Jacobsen became very popular and well known for his various designs of modern chairs. Born in 1902, and growing up during the great boom in the design work, this Danish architect helped develop a modern furniture style called Danish Modern which is still a top design choice in the modern world. Arne Jacobsen was focused on functionality in his designs, but was able to bring an edge of comfort to his chairs and sofas.

Initially, Jasobsen wanted to go into painting but was encouraged to move forward with a career in architecture by his dad. Jacobsen spent time studying at the Architecture School at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. As a student, Jacobsen began competing in design fairs around the world. It is said that when he went to the Paris Art Deco Fair, he saw the grand designer Le Corbusier and fell in love with his work and the aesthetics of his designs. He was also influenced by design greats Mies van der Rohe and Walter Gropius.

Known as an ultra-modern architect, Jacobsen spent several years creating out-of-the-box designs before fleeing his home during World War II. After restarting his career, he designed the SAS Hotel from the ground up – the contemporary furniture, rooms, everything.

These days, Jacobsen is most recognizable by his chair and contemporary furniture designs. One of his first chairs was the Ant Chair.

The Ant Chair is an elegant, yet simple stackable chair created in 1952 for the lounge area the Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk. Shaped similar to an “ant,” the chair had three legs and was very popular in modern design.

Another chair Jacobsen was famous for is the Model 3107 chair, which is noted as one of the most popular in Danish history with its use of techniques of bent plywood that were innovative when created in 1955. The chair, along with the ant chair, was inspired by a modern design by Charles and Ray Eames who also made a plastic armchair and chaise still popular today. The 3107 chair had multiple styles, as an office chair, had the ability to attach a writing desk and other materials. It is these features that make the piece timeless as it surely influenced other designs worldwide from New York to Italy.

Jacobsen was not done though. One of his next pieces was the Egg chair for a Radisson SAS hotel in Copenhagen. While other creations include the Cigar, the Grand Prix chair, the Pot and others, the Egg wasn’t your typical chair as it had a matching couch that was later discontinued. Jacobsen also made the Swan chair for the Radisson, and this design is still popular in contemporary furniture today with plenty of living rooms and home offices using a Swan chair.

In addition to architecture and furniture, Jaocbsen also made a stainless steel cocktail kit as well as faucets and accessories for your bathroom. Arne Jacobsen died in 1971 with plenty of new projectin the works, including major buildings in England such as the Danish National Bank and the Royal Danish Embassy.

Arne Jacobsen may be gone, but his modern furniture line is still a mainstay in interior designs.

 

 

 

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20th Century brings Danish furniture designers into the limelight

Posted on 15th June 2011 in Danish Furniture, Danish Furniture Designers

It was in the 20th Century when Danish furniture designers finally came of their own with a series of major furniture designs that have become what is considered a “modern classic” furniture style that bespeaks of the Danish motto of “form follows function.”

Early on, the design industry was heavily influenced by the great Bauhaus School of Design in Germany. Regardless of whether it was products such as furniture, kitchen goods, hardware and more, the improvements in product design made for quick advances with the changes in technology leading the way. Interior design and the outlying industries were no different. How one fashioned a home, from living room to patio was transformed by technology and the industrial age.

Denmark was no different, and in the early to mid 1900s brought many changes in how design was portrayed and viewed. Aesthetics were important, but aesthetics were drawn from the form of the shape required for furniture design, for example.  A chair was designed more how a human body functioned and flowed, with elongated chaises and deep egg like chairs.

These Danish furniture designs by greats such as Arne Jacobsen, Hans J. Wegner and Poul Henningsen.

Arne Jacobsen is one of the more popular modern Danish furniture designers. He was passionate about good design and it didn’t matter what type of furniture it was – chair, desk, bed or table – Jacobsen had a grand passion for creating it. Jacobsen was known for his interior design as well as his architectural design.  Key icons of his furniture design include the comfortable egg chair and the elegant swan chair, both of which represent the motto of form follows function and are neat, simple in design while being extremely functional.

Hans J. Wegner is known for an extensive design portfolio.  It is said that Wegner has over 500 different modern chair designs and his passion for beauty, form AND function led him to be a prolific, in-demand furniture designer. Wegner worked with Jacobsen before opening his own agency in the 1940s.

Wegner was prolific in his modern chair designs and indeed, many of his designs have become staples in the modern furniture industry today. Browse through any modern furniture store today, whether it’s Los Angeles, New York or Miami, and you will see designs based on both Jacobsen and Wegner. Both of these Danish furniture designers were cutting-edge, bold and emulated the modern form follows function mentality.

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Arne Jacobsen – Danish Furniture Designer

Posted on 7th March 2011 in Danish Furniture Designers, Furniture Designers

Famous for his broad range of chair designs, Arne Jacobsen considered himself an architect first despite his successes in furniture. Jacobsen became very popular and well known for his various designs of modern chairs. Born in 1902, and growing up during the great boom in the design work, this Danish architect helped develop a modern style called Danish Modern which is still a top design choice in the modern world. Arne Jacobsen was focused on functionality in his designs, but was able to bring an edge of comfort to his chairs and sofas.

Initially, Jasobsen wanted to go into painting but was encouraged to move forward with a career in architecture by his dad. Jacobsen spent time studying at the Architecture School at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. As a student, Jacobsen began competing in design fairs around the world. It is said that when he went to the Paris Art Deco Fair, he saw the grand designer Le Corbusier and fell in love with his work and the aesthetics of his designs. He was also influenced by design greats Mies van der Rohe and Walter Gropius.

Known as an ultra-modern architect, Jacobsen spent several years creating out-of-the-box designs before fleeing his home during World War II. After restarting his career, he designed the SAS Hotel from the ground up – the furniture, rooms, everything.

These days, Jacobsen is most recognizable by his chair and modern furniture designs. One of his first chairs was the Ant Chair.

The Ant Chair is an elegant, yet simple stackable chair created in 1952 for the lounge area the Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk. Shaped similar to an “ant,” the chair had three legs and was very popular in modern design.

Another chair Jacobsen was famous for is the Model 3107 chair, which is noted as one of the most popular in Danish history with its use of techniques of bent plywood that were innovative when created in 1955. The chair, along with the ant chair, was inspired by a modern design by Charles and Ray Eames who also made a plastic armchair and chaise still popular today. The 3107 chair had multiple styles, as an office chair, had the ability to attach a writing desk and other materials. It is these features that make the piece timeless as it surely influenced other designs worldwide from New York to Italy.

Jacobsen was not done though. One of his next pieces was the Egg chair for a Radisson SAS hotel in Copenhagen. While other creations include the Cigar, the Grand Prix chair, the Pot and others, the Egg wasn’t your typical chair as it had a matching couch that was later discontinued. Jacobsen also made the Swan chair for the Radisson, and this design is still popular in modern design today with plenty of living rooms and home offices using a Swan chair.

In addition to architecture and furniture, Jaocbsen also made a stainless steel cocktail kit as well as faucets and accessories for your bathroom. Arne Jacobsen died in 1971 with plenty of new projectin the works, including major buildings in England such as the Danish National Bank and the Royal Danish Embassy.

Arne Jacobsen may be gone, but his modern furniture line is still a mainstay in interior designs.

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